The Neuroscience of the Five Senses

This is part two of our four-part introduction to neuroscience series. For a review of the foundational concepts in neuroscience, please see our previous article. We have included a review of the anatomical terms of location below to assist readers unfamiliar with anatomical terminology. Anatomical Terms of Location A quick note regarding neuroanatomical nomenclature: the […]

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Foundational Concepts in Neuroscience

The following article is part one of our four-part introduction to neuroscience series. The articles will be released separately, but together will seek to produce a coherent story of the brain. We will begin at the cellular level; then explore the five senses; then discuss the systems involved in generating movement; and finally we will […]

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Cell Phones and Cancer: What’s the Real Risk?

On May 27, 2016 the National Toxicology Program (NTP), a research arm of the Department of Health and Human Services, published a report of partial findings from their cell phone carcinogenesis studies.1 The information contained within the report fanned the flames of a now almost quarter-century old debate over the relationship between cell phone use […]

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The Science of Alcoholism

Around 75,000 people in the United States die every year as a result of diabetes,1 while about 85,000 deaths per year are directly related to alcohol use.2 Researchers estimated that the annual cost burden of alcohol use in the United States in 2006 was approximately $223 billion.2 Ten percent of deaths in working age adults […]

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The Science of Personality: from Hannibal Lecter to Peter Parker

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary defines personality as, “the set of emotional qualities, ways of behaving, etc., that makes a person different from other people.” As a social species, early humans relied on the ability to accurately assess personality for survival. An explicit demand, effective with a more balanced neighbor, may have spelled trouble when directed towards an […]

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Can Money Buy Happiness? Yes, but Only $83,000 Worth of It.

Yearly household pre-tax income seems to predict happiness until about $83,000 (circa 2016), at which point higher tax brackets cease to predict greater happiness levels. In a now famous study, Drs. Kahneman and Deaton gathered data on household income, emotional well-being, and life satisfaction from more than 450,000 citizens of the United States between 2008 […]

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